EN
TH
Retina iPad Mini That You’ll Actually Find Useful - review
All Detail -> iPad -> Retina iPad Mini That You’ll Actually Find Useful - review

Retina iPad Mini That You’ll Actually Find Useful - review

View : 731

Apple has preferred outright quadrupling of pixel count (2x in each dimension) to create a Retina Display. With the mini's display using a 1024 x 768 resolution, this option would give it a 7.85-inch 2048 x 1536 panel. That would be the same resolution as the iPad 3/4, but in a much smaller display giving it a pixel density of 326 PPI (vs ~263 for the iPad 3/4). Apple could do this

Description : Retina iPad Mini That You’ll Actually Find Useful - review


See price : iPad Mini at Amazon


What's this? A review of the Retina iPad mini almost a month after launch? That's right. And although I haven't been using my new mini for that long, I've been using for more than the two or three hours logged by most of the folks who "reviewed" it on launch.
 
So if you are wondering if the new mini is noticeably heavier than the old one, or if it takes all night to charge it, or whether an iPad even needs LTE, then read on.


 
Display
Apple has preferred outright quadrupling of pixel count (2x in each dimension) to create a Retina Display. With the mini's display using a 1024 x 768 resolution, this option would give it a 7.85-inch 2048 x 1536 panel. That would be the same resolution as the iPad 3/4, but in a much smaller display giving it a pixel density of 326 PPI (vs ~263 for the iPad 3/4). Apple could do this, but it would then need to make all of the same changes it made in going to the iPad with Retina Display, primarily the introduction of a larger battery and much larger SoC. The bigger battery is needed to drive the more powerful backlight, and the X-series of SoCs is needed to actually render the UI and games at such a high resolution. Both of these things would increase the size and cost of the mini, which would make it distinctly un-mini.
 
Weight
So much of the experience of using a tablet is tied to the weight and distribution of said weight. The iPad Air is proof of just how true that is. Whereas the iPad Air straddled the line between comfortable one and two handed usage, the mini finds itself squarely in one handed territory. Picking up the mini after using the Air for a couple of weeks feels like I’m barely holding anything. The mini is by far the more comfortable of the two tablets to hold while lying down. Sitting upright I’m not sold on the weight loss being a huge benefit compared to the mini, but if I’m relaxing the mini is just so much nicer to hold.
 
I moved from the Wi-Fi model (308 grams) to the 3G/LTE model (341 grams), and I noticed the difference right away. I can also see the 0.3mm of extra thickness even when the old and new iPads aren't side-by-side. The new iPad mini is by no means heavy or fat, but if you're expecting something as impossibly light as the original you'll be disappointed. And even a week later I can still tell which iPad is which just by looking or touching (although the dents and scratches on the old one make this fairly easy)
 
LTE
Speaking of cellular, I'm going to say something that'll surely come back to bite me in the future: LTE is already more than fast enough for mobile devices. In fact, even 3G is already sufficient. But let's step back a second.
Apple sent an LTE model, which basically duplicated most of the functionality of my smartphone. With the LTE mini my smartphone stayed in my pocket more, although there are tons of combinations of small/large phone/tablet that you can enumerate for optimum computing these days. In many ways it’s like the discussion between small notebook + desktop vs. large notebook + docking station.

The A7-based mini is way faster at loading web pages than the old mini, but this has little to do with network speed and everything to do with rendering HTML, which is a surprisingly intensive task for a mobile device. Browsing at home on a 100Mb connection, the mini 1 drags and takes forever even to load simple pages. The mini 2 is a different world, popping even heavy pages into full view almost instantly (although not the Cult of Mac home page, which even my MacBook Air takes like ten seconds to load).
 

Charging

The battery enables the two killer features of the new mini: mainly Apple’s A7 SoC and of course, the 7.85-inch 2048 x 1536 Retina Display. Effectively addressing my chief issues with the original iPad mini, the new mini is substantially faster and comes with a significantly better display. Keep in mind the original mini debuted with an n-1 SoC (Apple’s A5 the year the A6 came out), which makes the move to the A7 this year even more substantial of an upgrade. While casual users would be hard pressed to tell the difference between an A6 and an A7, anyone who actively used last year's iPad mini will appreciate just how much quicker the new one is (particularly if you’ve upgraded to iOS 7). It’s awesome silicon enabling a much better experience.
 
The other part of this is battery life. For my use, which consists of lots of reading, lots of browsing and lots of music playing, the battery seems to drain slower than my year-old mini. This might be due to the battery on the mini 1 being a little older, or it may just be that the I use it for fewer minutes at a time as I'm not waiting for the damn apps to reload again. But I remember the original mini feeling like it drained faster than the iPad 3 before it, and the iPad 3 was slower than the all-time champion of iPad battery life, the iPad 2.


Case
A quick mention on cases. Many well-made iPad mini 1 cases are a tight fit for the mini 2. There seems to be a reason that Apple made its own Smart Case completely open at the front (the Smart Case is excellent by the way — it feels great, weighs very little and offers a lot of protection. I'll post my review this Friday). Saying this, I haven't yet come across a mini 1 case that won't fit the Retina mini: just beware if you're buying something super slim.


Like the iPad Air, the iPad mini is light enough that using any sort of case adds a good amount of weight to the device (percentage wise). I found myself taking the mini out of its case to use, and just keeping it protected when on the go.
Since the mini hasn’t really changed in form factor, the two first-party cases are pretty similar to what we got last year (the covers work with both mini generations). Like its bigger brother, the mini is offered with an optional Smart Cover or Smart Case depending on how much protection you want.
 
 
Go To : iPad Mini at Amazon
 










comments powered by Disqus

Home | Product | Devices | About Me | Contatc US

©Copyright 2013. All Right Reserved. www.garminvs.com Designed by garminvs